Menu

ASLA-NCC

American Society of Landscape Architects
Northern California Chapter

Awards

2013 Awards

Design: Parks, Recreation, Trails and Open Space

Honor Award

Legacy Park
Malibu, CA
Royston Hanamoto Alley & Abey (RHAA)
Principal in Charge: Barbara Lundburg
Project Manager: Cara Ruppert
Resource Principal: James Ingels
Client: City of Malibu

With almost 2 miles of trails and multiple gathering areas, every paved surface of the park uses permeable paving as a best management practice. The seed mix of the native prairie grasses was carefully curated in collaboration with a team of scientists from UCLA.
The north edge of the park is the Active Edge, serving as a threshold between the street and the site’s sensitive habitats. It features outdoor classrooms, interpretive features, environmental education, and large gathering areas for civic events.
The pedestrian trails wind through every habitat in the park. The Coastal Bluffs were formed from the soil removed to create the wetlands. They also buffer the park from the Pacific Coast Highway.
The Riparian Corridor connects the Water Entry Source Plaza to the detention basin.  Providing important habitat for river species, it also slows and filters the water as it travels through the site.
The Western Fence Lizard is one of the eight large animal mosaic sculptures built for the park. Each animal is placed within its native habitat and paired with an interpretive sign, providing an educational lesson for park visitors.
The Interpretation Area plaza contains three mosaic sculptures that were located so that visitors could easily interact with them. The California King Snake slithers around boulders while providing a play feature for younger park visitors.
The north edge of the park is the “Active Edge,” serving as a threshold between the street and the site’s sensitive habitats. It features outdoor classrooms, interpretive features, environmental education, and large gathering areas for civic events.
A view across the stormwater detention basin to the Environmental Education Center.  The basin filters up to 8 acre feet of water and restores an endangered habitat for hundreds of native and migrating species.
A late spring view across the stormwater detention basin and wetlands.  The majority of the native wetlands along the Santa Monica Bay were long ago destroyed to make room for development. Legacy Park restores a critical ecosystem, providing habitat for native plants and animals, while cleaning and filtering stormwater.
With assistance from environmental scientists, extensive research of the ecosystems of coastal Southern California led to the strategic recreation of six endangered native coastal habitats. Each habitat zone, all native to Malibu, features an animal mosaic sculpture within its native habitat; the coyote sits at the edge of the Woodland habitat.
Malibu’s Cleaning Machine: an artist’s view of the site after 15 years of growth. The journey of the stormwater is interpreted at the Water Source Entry Plaza.
Site Plan showing the key elements of the landscape design and stormwater management systems.

Legacy Park, in the heart of downtown Malibu, is a once-vacant lot turned 15-acre “smart park.” Gracefully combining an innovative stormwater treatment process with a community park, environmental education classroom and habitat restoration program, Legacy Park sets a powerful precedent of environmental stewardship while providing a beautiful sanctuary for its citizens and visitors.

The park educates its visitors through traditional and innovative design techniques: giant mosaic sculptures of native animals compose a children’s play area, informal outdoor classrooms are sited directly across from the city’s public library, and walking paths are lined with signs describing the native plants and water treatment system. The park stewardship program was envisioned to engage local schools and universities to study and maintain the natural park processes, teaching an environmental ethic to local students.